Sea House Pavilion Remodel: Front Entry

front_102917

Work has begun on framing in the front entry, using 3/8-inch stock to match the existing structure. I chose a set of Houseworks French doors, installed backwards so they open outward. There will be a 5-inch wide transom window above. The door woodwork is finished in an eggshell white stain, and the two side panels will be reclaimed weathered gray horizontal planking.

front_transom_source

I got curious about the line weights in intricate pattern that I might successfully cut (and remove from the mat) on the Cricut, and got down to 6 points (.083-inch / 2.1 mm). This seems a good scale for the narrow panels of the doors and transom (the greenhouse window leading is 9 points (.125- inch / 3.2 mm).

inside4_102917

The difference in scale between the front doors and the greenhouse windows makes sense (especially now that I know I can cut finer line weights). The interior front wall will be planked in the eggshell white stain, with a matte varnish.

inside5_102917

Now I’m thinking on how the ceiling between the main floor and the sleeping loft will work, and how to finish out the fireplace through to the roof — some tricksy geometries. I ordered a bunch of vegetable kits from Georgie Steeds at The Miniature Garden — my favorite miniature plant kit purveyor — to populate the long shelf in the greenhouse. The interior greenhouse windows are open to the room so the potted trees can reach out.

gh_inside_102917

Also, how is it almost November?!

 

 

 

19 thoughts on “Sea House Pavilion Remodel: Front Entry

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Thanks, Sheila! It turned out well, but now after planking the interior walls, I’m considering adding two smaller windows flanking the transom for more light into the interior. Except right now, I’m *done* with windows and don’t want to make anymore. Except that it would look good. Does this ever happen to you?

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Oh thank you, Ingi! I am so enjoying the remodel: the storytelling, exploration and problem solving. And using up and/or repurposing so many things from my stash :)

  1. mormson says:

    The doors are perfect. They could not be anything else! Was just thinking how to get into your loft space without encumbering the area with stairs…. how about a retractable loft ladder? There’s a challenge for you. Marilyn

      • Nancy Enge says:

        I’ll take pix of the one I have. Then you’ll know why I have no desire to recreate it. (Or use it. Too fussy, not at all post-sea-rise salvage :)

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Pfaw, Marilyn. And thank you :) It’s very exciting to have determined I can cut designs with a finer line weight. I’m thinking about loft access as well… I actually have a well-made retractable attic ladder from many years ago, when I bought miniatures for assemblage art pieces. I examined it today, and it’s hopelessly too fine and complicated for me to replicate. But. The idea persists, probably in a more robust cabin-y form. We shall see!

  2. Barbara W. says:

    This “makeover” is rapidly becoming very elegant! I was having a major case of greenhouse envy, so my daughter ordered me a glasshouse from Pottery Barn that will lend itself vey well to some of my miniatures and my citrus seedlings. It is beyond exciting (to me) to think of growing lemon and grapefruit trees from seeds here in the frozen north.

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Oh dear, BW! Elegant is not at all what I’m going for. Well, except as a byproduct of the inadvertent beauty of recycling and reusing. Also, oh dear me, an old Police lyric just occurred: “When the world is running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”
      I think I know the PotBarn glass greenhouse your daughter gifted you; it’s beautiful! And growing citrus from seeds is practically like having children. Best of nature and nurture to you.

  3. elizabeth s says:

    After viewing your post, I feel like I’ve just come back from a seaside vacation!
    It’s STUNNING Nancy, and the effects of the frosted leaded glass gives a foggy, mysterious quality to both the interior/ exterior in a mesmerizing way.

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Elizabeth, my work here is done :)
      The non-glare Plaskolite is a new material to me. I got it at Home Depot for another project; it is very reasonably priced, and in a convenient size. I used the clear plexi that came with the French doors, and comparing the two substrates, I think I like the Plaskolite better, for exactly those qualities you noticed.
      However :) For the outdoor shower room, I’ll use clear plexiglass, to invoke the sense of privacy and freedom of the high seas. Or at least, a post-sea level-rise world.

  4. Bennie says:

    I love how the front doors tie in to the greenhouse windows. I also love the ceiling’s map wallpaper.

  5. Keli says:

    I’m curious about your substance gatherer caretaker’s back-story. It appears he perhaps has a trust fund….or maybe he made a fortune in the dot.com boom then retreated from the fast lane…a former television star who now only does enough work to pay the bills?

    • Nancy Enge says:

      How about: The caretaker has a long history with the Sea House Pleasure Pier and Resort empire. She grew up at Sea House, the only child of the estate managers, and was very close to the extended Sea House family. As children, they roamed semi-feral the surrounding beaches, bluffs, fields and woodlands. She learned carpentry and horticulture and how to sail, as well as needle and textile arts.
      Wait, I have to go to work now, but you can see where this is going…

  6. Nancy Bristow says:

    Now that my garden has been put to bed for the winter, I’m back in miniature mode. I love that you are sharing your WIP of your Sea House Pavilion remodel. It’s amazing and I’m lusting after your many, many Yucca’s in Braxton pots!

    As you know, so far I’ve only got a couple of Yucca’s made of my own from your most outstanding kit but I’m coming to love the Yucca as much as I love the Hens and Chicks. I’m over the moon about the pairing I did with some of each. The variety available in both of these plant worlds is mind blowing and opens such a palette for the miniaturist.

    Thank you for letting us observe your Sea House Pavilion remodel journey…as a miniaturist, it gives me great joy to watch your progress and your problem solving abilities. You do terrific work! xoxo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s