Sketchbooks Listed, Echeveria Eyecandy

sketchbook_kit_contents

The sketchbooks are kitted and listed! Each kit makes three books. The pages are cream-colored and acid-free :) You have a choice of cover colors: black, Warm (orange, yellow and gray) or kraft. I went detailed on the instructions, and introduce a good vocabulary word: bifolium (singular); bifolia (plural).

warm_sketchbooks

Here are three sketchbooks in Warm, before their bookmarks get trimmed.

I was shuffling around outside, pulling weeds between storms, and noticed this leggy echeveria on the shadier side of the yard is working on a flower display.

echeveria

Buds closeup:

echeveria_flower_closeup

Love these colors. And just before it started raining again, (wind blowing, hard to focus) this closeup of a hen-and-chicks echeveria flower:

echeveria_flowers

Yum.

8 thoughts on “Sketchbooks Listed, Echeveria Eyecandy

  1. elizabeth s says:

    Your sketch books are Adorable Nancy, and I like the colors too! Also quite fascinated by your leggy echeveria. This species of plant life is so architecturally interesting and structurally solid, that I feel that no garden is complete without them.

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Thank you, Elizabeth! And I’m with you on the brilliance of succulents. I’ve lived in this house for less than three years, and have been slowly renovating the overgrown and drought-ravaged landscaping. All of the succulent plantings are propagated from cuttings from friends, neglected scavenging, and parched garden rescues; all are thriving :) I would have more specimens indoors, but Scarlett is a terror on hapless potted plants.

  2. Barbara W. says:

    I can hardly wait to start assembling and hopefully sketching! Your garden looks lovely. There is snow yet again in our forecast for next week – seems slightly unfair now that it’s April.

    • Nancy Enge says:

      BW, I understand your weather even less than ours, but have settled on “unsettled” as a generic descriptor. I’ve been playing with the sketchbooks and might suggest sketching before assembling… but then again, it depends on your intended outcome. These books mold really well to open-page spreads. *Really* hoping you’ll find a way to share work :)

  3. Keli says:

    There is nothing not to love about this post. Round cornered sketchbooks, new vocabulary words, and a view of a garden fascinating because it is so different than my own zone five landscape. I have several varieties of sedum, and hens-and-chicks, but echeveria wouldn’t survive the winter. Please document your flower display for us :)

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Oh gee wow, Keli, thanks! I love this about our community, the random glimpses of other-zone gardening :) Vocabulary, and the love of words, is pretty intentional, and only some people get it, but it’s maybe even more satisfying than a good cup of tea. The exceptional winter rains here are prompting all kinds of flowering … and weeds. I have dandelions five feet tall. Will document :)

  4. Keli says:

    There is a little strip of wild ground a foot wide, along the edge of the parking lot behind my hair stylist’s building. In it was growing the prettiest plant, with big yellow flowers. I was surprised when I investigated and found it was a dandelion. I had no idea they got larger than the few inch tall plants scattered in my lawn. All summer I collected seed heads from my lawn dandelions, then last weekend put them on a patch of the garden I’ve never been able to grow anything in, and covered them with a layer of mulch so they don’t blow away. Now I wait.

    Another note…I am in the middle of a book I think you would enjoy. Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries, by Kory Stamper.

    • Nancy Enge says:

      Charming *and* hilarious, “Keli’s Dandelion Patch”. A gardener friend says that dandelions’ long tap roots cycle nutrients from deep within the soil, so perhaps your patch will be enriched!
      And oooooh, many thanks for the book recommendation. Checking it out now!

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